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The Art of the Fans of Phish

42 Degress Art

This week in PhanArt History: Tre/Che and ‘Technicolor Dreamcoat’ posters for Mockingbird

New from PhanArt in 2011 is our weekly Friday Feature: This Week in PhanArt History. Each piece of art we share is from days of Phish in the past, typically from the 1.0 and 2.0 eras, something of note that fans of all ages can appreciate that is featured in the book PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish, with some commentary on the piece by PhanArt Pete. If there is a piece of art or genre of PhanArt you would like to see, leave a suggestion in the comments below.

As Trey tour continues this week, we feature a few more pieces of Trey related art from PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish.

Created by Ryan Kerrigan is ‘The Technicolor Dreamcoat’, a poster made in 2000 by Kerrigan in an edition of 500.  Most were sold over the course of 2000 and 3 were recently sold to benefit Mockingbird Foundation at a total of $150.

From 2004 era of shirts, we have Trey as Tre, aka, Che Guevara. While Trey is not a Communist revolutionary (that we know of) he did write some great lyrics for ‘Crowd Control’ which spoke volumes of the state of Phish in the 2003-4 era. This shirt was originally designed by Shirzad Khusrokhan and Marty Millman.

If Phish Songs 3.0 were a rating scale……

If Phish songs in the 3.0 era were a rating scale from 1-10, with 1 being the worst, 10 being the best, we think it might look something like this:

1. Time Turns Elastic

2. Let me Lie

3. Grind

4. Sugar Shack

5. Hartford Psycho Kicculus

6. Worcester Hood

7. Miami Tweezer

8. Greek Cities

9. Camden Chalkdust

10. 7 Below -> Ghost

What would your Scale from 1-10 be?

Lego Big Red

Lego Big Red is the first installment of The Boys in Lego Form.  Each one is posable for enjoyment of a show in your own home.  Big Red’s bandmates will be available soon. Each Lego 1 & 1/2 inches tall and costs $7.99 which includes shipping. Paypal link is below.

Summer Tour 2011 Dates, Leg 1 and some possible July/August dates

Here are the rumored Phish tour dates ready to be announced any time now. Looks like west coast will get love later this summer, and more dates expected to appease west-coasters.

For now, we have TWO Three-night runs in NY, a return to Holmdel, NJ (first in 11 years) and another 2-night run in Alpharetta. Alot of Northeast love as usual, all up and down the east coast and into the midwest.

Where are Alpine Valley, Deer Creek, SPAC, Chicago, Jones Beach and Burgettstown? Think August……

Rumored dates for Summer 2011, Leg 1

(credit to Dogoneblog and Shakedownblog for dates)

5/27-29 Bethel Woods

5/31 – 6/1 PNC Holmdel, NJ

6/3 DTE Energy Center, Detroit, MI

6/4 Blossom Music Center, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

6/5 Riverbend Music Center, Cincinnati, Ohio

6/7 Comcast Center, Mansfield, MA

6/8 Darien Lake Amphitheatre

6/10 Susquehanna Bank Center, Camden, NJ

6/11-12 Merriweather Post Pavilion, Columbia, MD

6/14-15 Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre – Alpharetta, GA

6/17 Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre, Charlotte, NC

6/18 Time Warner Cable Music Pavilion, Raleigh, NC

6/19 Ntelos Pavilion at Harbor Center, Portsmouth, VA

Not announced, but probable:

7/01 Watkins Glen, NY

7/02 Watkins Glen, NY

7/03 Watkins Glen, NY

This Week in PhanArt History: The many faces of Trey

New from PhanArt in 2011 is our weekly Friday Feature: This Week in PhanArt History. Each piece of art we share is from days of Phish in the past, typically from the 1.0 and 2.0 eras, something of note that fans of all ages can appreciate that is featured in the book PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish, with some commentary on the piece by PhanArt Pete. If there is a piece of art or genre of PhanArt you would like to see, leave a suggestion in the comments below.

There were over 100 submissions to PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish related to the 4 band members, Trey, Jon, Mike and Page, but one stood out, garnering over 40 submissions of art that were ultimately used in the book. Of these many, we will share one or two each week during this Winter TAB Tour.  The first piece is by Louis Arzonico, who captures through a most creative lens the likeness of The Bad Liuetenant. Made around 1999, Louis gets very visual and psychedelic in a cartoony Muppet take on our favorite gutiar player Big Red. The second piece was submitted by Noah Phence, who’s sticker and PhanArt collection was one of the top 5 contributers to the book, adding at 100-150 pieces of unique art that he made or collected over the course of his pre-breakup touring. Simply put, Trey is Good, but he is also Caspian, which means Trey is Fuckerpants. At some points of the later 1.0 and much of 2.0, you could make an argument for the latter and not the former, but he still generates a great deal of love beyond the judgement of a few.

Created by Louis Arzonico

submitted to PhanArt by Noah Phence

Four Jones Beach Posters up for Auction for Mockingbird

Continuing with our successful auction for Mockingbird in 2011 that have netted over $150 so far this year, we have four posters from artists featured on the PhanArt Blog who graciously donated their art to support music education. Please take a look at the auction and support The Mockingbird Foundation!

Featured in the auction are four posters from Jones Beach and Summer 2010 tour

Erin Cadigan’s poster for 2nd leg of summer tour. Based on the Virgin of Guadeloupe, the clouds are the venues and dates. The print measures 12″x18″, comes from a signed and numbered edition of 113 and is printed on 1-33 Champagne pearlized 100# cover 34-113 Cougar felted 100#cover (nice white paper). This poster is #80/113

Vinny Naro’s poster is 12×18″ on 100lb. uncoated stock in an edition of 150. Each poster is signed and numbered. This poster is an Artists Proof.

Bruce Horan’s poster is 9.5X15″ and printed on 300 gsm Coventry Rag paper. A 2 color silkscreen
with metallic silver ink, this poster is signed and numbered. This poster number is 23/80.

Jonathan Caplan’s Jones Beach print is a 13” x 19” Giclee print from J Cap Design is a signed and numbered edition of 20. It was printed the day before the Jones Beach shows this August, and features the mock-quote “We don’t want no night sky”. This poster is #7/20

All these prints and more are featured on the PhanArt Blog – www.phanart.net/blog – check it out daily for new art made by Phish fans, with a percent of each donation going to The Mockingbird Foundation

All proceeds from this auction will benefit the Mockingbird Foundation, which supports music education across the country. Check out www.mbird.org for more info.

PhanFood signing 2/20/11 in Albany, NY (day after TAB at Palace)

On Sunday February 20th,  The Healthy Hippie Taraleigh Weathers and PhanArt Pete will be signing copies of PhanFood at The Book House in Stuyvesant Plaza in Albany, NY. Trey Anastasio Band is playing the night before so before heading home Sunday, come to The Book House, check out PhanFood and meet the authors!

Tell your friends!

‘The Open Source Phish Code’ by Benjy Eisen (Excerpt from PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish)

In celebration of PhanArt’s 2nd Anniversary of being published, this week we are sharing excerpts from select articles written exclusively for PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish. To read more of this article and other great reviews of the Phish community and unique style of art, pick up the book here

An excerpt from ‘The Open Source Phish Code’ by Benjy Eisen, writer for jambands.com and many other fine publications, originally published in PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish (2009, Allegra)

Unless you know how to see in Technicolor, I admit, it may seem a little thin: For much of my 20s, I followed around a rock band. Thousands of others did too. We spent entire summers traveling all over the country to watch the same band play night after night. When we weren’t at the concerts, we spent our time collecting recordings of the concerts, discussing the concerts (past and present), and preparing for the next batch of concerts. It’s okay, you can think it — it sounds shallow. Like we missed the mark. But we didn’t.

You see, we didn’t merely follow a band around the country; sometimes we led them. Sometimes we led each other, sometimes we fed each other, and always we fed off of each other. Phish was always fond of acknowledging from the stage that tours took more than just the four musicians. You see, when you stepped into a Phish show, you stepped into a different dimension — one in which you became a creative, artistic, free participant. An active participant. You engaged while also being engaged.

Other concerts go something like this: You meet up with your friends, have dinner somewhere near the arena, pay $10 to park, drink a few beers, go inside, dawdle during the opening band, find your seats, watch the concert and go home.

Phish shows weren’t like that. At Phish shows, you were expected to do more. It was in the contract. Part of the deal, you see. Part of the appeal, you see. And if you toured with the band, forget it — you were in deep!

Between 1993 and 2004, I saw somewhere around 150 Phish shows, stretched over 11 years, 25 states, and two countries. I spent the best nights of my life with Phish and I have a hell of a lot to show for it. Most of it is intangible — it’s in my eyes, the way I walk, the manner in which I carry myself, even in my sigh. But physically, apart from a box full of ticket stubs and photographs, I have artwork in myriad forms picked up along the way. The art — whether primitive or skilled — serves as a concrete reminder of all that is divine in my life. They’re sacred objects. I have a silk-screened t-shirt bought on 7/5/94 in Ottawa, Canada from a guy who reminded me of a cartoon drug dealer. The shirt no longer fits, but I look at it and remember getting lost in French-speaking Canada on the way to the show.

To read more, check out the book here

‘Inaugural Ball’ by Amy Pedatella (Excerpt from PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish)

In celebration of PhanArt’s 2nd Anniversary of being published, this week we are sharing excerpts from select articles written exclusively for PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish. To read more of this article and other great reviews of the Phish community and unique style of art, pick up the book here

An excerpt from ‘Inaugural Ball’ by Amy Pedatella, originally published in PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish (2009, Allegra)

The year was 1996 and I was quickly becoming a Phish fan. As winter ended, the band made the announcement that they would be hosting a weekend festival in northern New York. The show was slated to be called The Clifford Ball and scheduled for the end of summer, without hesitation I was “in” and anxiously awaited ticket sales. Talking this phenomenon up with my friends, I found two eager participants. We purchased our tickets, made preliminary preparations and awaited mid-August.

Submitted by Noah Phence for PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish

Apparently my friends were not as into Phish as I was, and purchased H.O.R.D.E. Tour tickets for the Friday of that same weekend. Wanting to forgo the H.O.R.D.E I was unable to find any takers for their tickets. I was left no choice but to attend the show at Randall’s Island, New York with them and immediately following travel directly to The Ball. Halfway through the Spin Doctors set, my friend decided to pass out and land in First-Aid after ingesting who knows what?

Always the optimist I thought, ‘she’ll shake it off.’ This is the point when my other friend at the show decided to piss in my Cheerios and pull the plug on the whole operation, taking our other friend home.

The H.O.R.D.E. was had, the hour was zero, and I found myself under the Triborough Bridge with three Clifford Ball tickets, a station wagon and nobody up for the mission. I had to beg and plead with anyone who will listen in a futile attempt to gain candidates. I had no choice but to go it alone. My rather straightedge brother had been at the H.O.R.D.E. also and got wind of my antics. Being the supportive older brother that he is, my brother refused to let me travel alone and decided to join me. He and I had seen Phish about three weeks prior in Rome, Italy, as part of an audience of less than 200 as they opened for Santana. He would have liked people to believe that he was going to escort me, but I knew better. He had experienced

To read more, check out the book here

‘Hippies Understand Capitalism’ by Dan Greenhaus (excerpt from PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish)

In celebration of PhanArt’s 2nd Anniversary of being published, this week we are sharing excerpts from select articles written exclusively for PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish. To read more of this article and other great reviews of the Phish community and unique style of art, pick up the book here

An excerpt from ‘Hippies Understand Capitalism‘ by Dan Greenhaus, originally published in PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish (2009, Allegra)

Capitalism. It is the central theme that underpins just about everything in our country. Standing in stark contrast to other social systems such as communism and socialism, capitalism manages to bring out the most ingenious concepts and products, as the lure of a potentially unlimited payday will forever lead humans to push further and further, and reach higher and higher.

Capitalism, and the concepts of supply and demand and free markets, exist all around us. Once can find these ideas in many places, whether in its purest form (as most would assert) by way of the stock market, or at the local deli, toy store or, a little more surprisingly if you’ve never been there, the lot before a Phish show. The latter might be a surprise to some people who, when queried about the idea of a “hippie,” would sooner imagine a dreadlocked stoner smoking too much pot while following a band around the country than a businessman earning a living pursuing a passion the likes of which most people would, and could, never understand.

But when one looks closer, what they’ll find along the famed “Shakedown Street” is the economic incarnation of Capitalism in a pure form. People sell goods priced at a level pursuant to the demand in the marketplace set before them, with the underlying intention of earning a profit. In “The Wealth of Nations,” Adam Smith portended that the essence of a “trade” was the person obtaining an item felt that item obtained was of equal or greater value than whatever they may be relinquishing the right to in exchange for the item. It is that underlying concept that pulsates through the lot, and through the subconscious of that same dreadlocked hippie, regardless of whether he realizes it or not. It’s the lifeblood of the mini-society that has been built up around both The Grateful Dead and more recently, Phish and as such, a case could be made that the communities, much like our country, could not exist without it.

To read more, check out the book here

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