Category Archives: This Week in PhanArt

phrames new Fishman Donuts Nalgene is here

Phrames is thrilled to have worked with Nalgene Water Bottle Company on this is 32 oz Wide Mouth bottle which is BPA Free and made in the USA.
Each features the classic Fishman Donut pattern along with “you’ve got one life, blaze on” in small font around the bottom of the bottle. The Nalgene is a blue translucent bottle with a blue cap.
The large opening on our wide-mouth bottles easily accommodates ice cubes, fits most water purifiers and filters, and makes hand-washing a breeze. The attached loop-top never gets lost and screws on and off easily. Printed graduations let you keep track of your hydration. The Name Bar will help you identify your Nalgene from the rest of your crew’s bottles.
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This Week in PhanArt History: Vegas 2004

New from PhanArt in 2011 is our weekly Friday Feature: This Week in PhanArt History. Each piece of art we share is from days of Phish in the past, typically from the 1.0 and 2.0 eras, something of note that fans of all ages can appreciate that is featured in the book PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish, with some commentary on the piece by PhanArt Pete. If there is a piece of art or genre of PhanArt you would like to see, leave a suggestion in the comments below.

Submitted by Frank and Christine Cortazzo, this sticker takes the iconic ‘Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas’ and changed it to ‘We Come for Fabulous Phish’

Created by Not Pollock, these prints are given out free to a lucky few in the lots. As the saying goes, ‘If its not free, its not Not Pollock’

By Jason Lees, This Joker poster has a playing card design with reflections on both side of the joker in his 3-coned cap, hoisting a martini with his purple humpback whake and showing his cards: 15, 16, 17, the April 2004 dates.

Isadora Bullock‘s Elvis poster has The King riding The Famous Mockingbird into outer space (where many of us would have blasted off to, had the shows not been a barrel of meh) holding The Helping Friendly Book.

Troy Alexander, Canadian artist extraordinaire and Eh-List Phish fan made numerous amazing posters of this caliber in the Phish 2.0 era. The detail on the upside down faces, mandalas in the center and vivid coloring made this an easy collectors item in the Spring of 2004

See all these and more in PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish

This Week in PhanArt History: Japan 2000

New from PhanArt in 2011 is our weekly Friday Feature: This Week in PhanArt History. Each piece of art we share is from days of Phish in the past, typically from the 1.0 and 2.0 eras, something of note that fans of all ages can appreciate that is featured in the book PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish, with some commentary on the piece by PhanArt Pete. If there is a piece of art or genre of PhanArt you would like to see, leave a suggestion in the comments below.

The Japanese connection to Phish has been consistent since the 1999 Fuji Rock Fest shows which were recently released on Live Phish. In the Summer of 2000, Phish returned to Japan for a run of shows that a lucky few American fans were able to take part in.

In reflecting on this era of Phish and PhanArt, as well as the recent events in Northeast Japan, we share with you the story of Jason Lees, featured artist in PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish. Also, PhanArtists Lizzy Layne and Ryan Kerrigan have generously donated some of their original artwork to raise funds to benefit Peace Winds America’s Japan Relief Fund. Read to see how you can help and the great art you can get in return for a small donation.

Japan 2000, by Jason Lees

So we’re in Japan of all places, in the midst of a week of Phish shows. We’d been just living it up every night and really getting along with the local heads. Though the language barrier was certainly apparent, a shit eating grin is a shit eating grin no matter what language you speak. It seemed everyone on this tour wore this shit eating grin the entire time.

As we’re walking out of one of the venues (forgive me if I can’t recall which), after another glorious night of music and there’s actually a mini-shakedown street happening. And when I say mini, I mean 4 or 5 vendors selling shirts, one selling jewelry as well as the ever-present Japanese mushroom vendor. One shirt vendor has this great shirt with the word Japhan on the front with a hook through one of the letters. An instant classic. Another shirt vendor had one with a rectangle of Japanese characters where the missing characters spelled out ‘PHISH’. This shirt also had a great print on the back with all the dates and a fish in a kimono waving a Japanese flag. These were quality shirts sold by eager vendors and were an easy sell at 10 yen a piece ($10).

Anyway I’m walking away with two new tour shirts in hand and I see off to the side a young native guy with who appeared to be his girlfriend. They couldn’t have been more then 19. He was tentatively holding up a purple t-shirt but it was really hard to see what was printed on the front. He was almost unsure if he wanted anyone to look at it. Well I walked over to him and asked to see it. The front was like a small jigsaw puzzle of intersecting fish, almost looked like a wood block print of an M.C. Escher design but it wasn’t an M.C. Escher. I gave him a big smile and he turned it around. The back read “Welcome this is the…. PHISH Japan tour 2000″. Then in chicken scratch lettering it gave all the dates and venue information. Below that was the outline of a farmhouse and the words “Think Global Act Local”. All this was obviously hand drawn with different colored paints. And this young guy was obviously the artist. When I expressed how much I loved the shirt his entire demeanor shifted from uneasy to ecstatic. He and his girlfriend were so happy that I appreciated his work. And I sincerely loved the shirt. It was a one of a kind, very unique and I just had to have it. I bought the shirt, exchanged several more smiles with these folks and headed on my way.

But the story doesn’t end there. A show or two later I’m wearing my new purple lot shirt enjoying the buzz of set break when who comes eagerly walking up to me but the couple I bought the shirt from. Though I couldn’t understand a word they were saying, it was obvious they were excited to see me actually wearing the shirt. And it became even more obvious that he wanted to have his picture taken with me wearing his shirt. How could I say no? So the simple act of buying a lot shirt fueled so much positive energy. It helped bridge the language barrier of two very different cultures. And who knows, it may have encouraged this young artist to keep creating beautiful works of art.

You can pick up tons of great PhanArt, both new and old in the PhanArt Store

This Week in PhanArt History: Northwest Tour 1993

New from PhanArt in 2011 is our weekly Friday Feature: This Week in PhanArt History. Each piece of art we share is from days of Phish in the past, typically from the 1.0 and 2.0 eras, something of note that fans of all ages can appreciate that is featured in the book PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish, with some commentary on the piece by PhanArt Pete. If there is a piece of art or genre of PhanArt you would like to see, leave a suggestion in the comments below.

Submitted to PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish by Brendan, aka Weatherman on PT, this shirt is the only one known to have been sold by fans on Spring 1993 Tour, one of the most extensive in Phish History. Brendan noted that he got this shirt, his favorite of all fan shirts he has bought over the years, that he picked this shirt up on 3/25/93 or 3/28/93. This is the era when Phish PhanArt started to become more common at shows and became an entrenched part of the Phish community

This Week in PhanArt History: Random art of fans

New from PhanArt in 2011 is our weekly Friday Feature: This Week in PhanArt History. Each piece of art we share is from days of Phish in the past, typically from the 1.0 and 2.0 eras, something of note that fans of all ages can appreciate that is featured in the book PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish, with some commentary on the piece by PhanArt Pete. If there is a piece of art or genre of PhanArt you would like to see, leave a suggestion in the comments below.

This week we feature some of the random art submitted to PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish that is otherwise uncategorized – shirts, stickers and the like that are related to songs, events or tours, but do not fall neatly into a particular category.

Created by Brian Patrick Henry, this shirt is circa 1997, when Calvin and Hobbes was still something the kids remembered and identified with, as there were many Grateful Dead shirts from the early 90s that featured the cartoon duo. On first glance, the song references Suzy Greenberg, but that is Calvin’s neighbor Suzie (actually Susie) who he is not being a nice guy to, thus referencing Mike’s Song.

From the extensive collection of Noah Phence, this COL 4BN sticker highlights the Vermont license plate, even noting two small marijuana references. The first, a small pot leaf in the upper left hand corner of the sticker and in the bottom right corner, a fake expiration tag of 420B24-7.

Submitted to PhanArt from the collection of Frank and Christine Cortazzo, this sticker’s exact date is not easily discernible due to the conflict of IT in the background and 2004 Phish Tour on the sticker. It references 7/29/03 where Jimmy was revealed to be Fishman, and he was searching for IT. So it is possible this sticker was made in 2004 for Vegas or one of the two legs of the Summer tour.

Submitted by Gregg Kelley, this sticker was purchased on ebay during the hiatus of 10/00 and 12/02, making it difficult to date, but based on the genesis  of Gotta Jibboo on the Farmhouse album, it could have been made ay any time during or after the Summer of 2000er 2003.

This Week in PhanArt History: Winter 2003

New from PhanArt in 2011 is our weekly Friday Feature: This Week in PhanArt History. Each piece of art we share is from days of Phish in the past, typically from the 1.0 and 2.0 eras, something of note that fans of all ages can appreciate that is featured in the book PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish, with some commentary on the piece by PhanArt Pete. If there is a piece of art or genre of PhanArt you would like to see, leave a suggestion in the comments below.

Winter 2003 was all about the rebirth and renewal of Phish. After 4 shows to ring in 2003, the band went coast to coast in just over 2 weeks, taking some fortunate fans on a whirlwind tour around the country before wrapping up things until July. Fans who were artists or creative enough to make something Phish related found themselves in Disneyland, with 9 separate stops to incorporate into their art.

Ryan Kerrigan’s collection of show posters from 2003 is long sold-out, but his Nassau 2003 was just one example of the great art made for each of the venues. In an edition of 100 prints, its classic Kerrigan.

This shirt was submitted to PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish by Christine and Frank Cortazzo. Their collection was one of the major contributors to the creation of PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish and the PhanArt Archives.

This last piece was drawn by Drew Suto for the Winter 2003 edition of Surrender to the Flow. Drew’s drawings capture neatly the regional personality of venue stops with ease.

This week in PhanArt History: Tre/Che and ‘Technicolor Dreamcoat’ posters for Mockingbird

New from PhanArt in 2011 is our weekly Friday Feature: This Week in PhanArt History. Each piece of art we share is from days of Phish in the past, typically from the 1.0 and 2.0 eras, something of note that fans of all ages can appreciate that is featured in the book PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish, with some commentary on the piece by PhanArt Pete. If there is a piece of art or genre of PhanArt you would like to see, leave a suggestion in the comments below.

As Trey tour continues this week, we feature a few more pieces of Trey related art from PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish.

Created by Ryan Kerrigan is ‘The Technicolor Dreamcoat’, a poster made in 2000 by Kerrigan in an edition of 500.  Most were sold over the course of 2000 and 3 were recently sold to benefit Mockingbird Foundation at a total of $150.

From 2004 era of shirts, we have Trey as Tre, aka, Che Guevara. While Trey is not a Communist revolutionary (that we know of) he did write some great lyrics for ‘Crowd Control’ which spoke volumes of the state of Phish in the 2003-4 era. This shirt was originally designed by Shirzad Khusrokhan and Marty Millman.

This Week in PhanArt History: The many faces of Trey

New from PhanArt in 2011 is our weekly Friday Feature: This Week in PhanArt History. Each piece of art we share is from days of Phish in the past, typically from the 1.0 and 2.0 eras, something of note that fans of all ages can appreciate that is featured in the book PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish, with some commentary on the piece by PhanArt Pete. If there is a piece of art or genre of PhanArt you would like to see, leave a suggestion in the comments below.

There were over 100 submissions to PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish related to the 4 band members, Trey, Jon, Mike and Page, but one stood out, garnering over 40 submissions of art that were ultimately used in the book. Of these many, we will share one or two each week during this Winter TAB Tour.  The first piece is by Louis Arzonico, who captures through a most creative lens the likeness of The Bad Liuetenant. Made around 1999, Louis gets very visual and psychedelic in a cartoony Muppet take on our favorite gutiar player Big Red. The second piece was submitted by Noah Phence, who’s sticker and PhanArt collection was one of the top 5 contributers to the book, adding at 100-150 pieces of unique art that he made or collected over the course of his pre-breakup touring. Simply put, Trey is Good, but he is also Caspian, which means Trey is Fuckerpants. At some points of the later 1.0 and much of 2.0, you could make an argument for the latter and not the former, but he still generates a great deal of love beyond the judgement of a few.

Created by Louis Arzonico
submitted to PhanArt by Noah Phence

This Week in PhanArt History – ‘I Survived Hiatus’ shirt by John Street Graphics

New from PhanArt in 2011 is our weekly Friday Feature: This Week in PhanArt History. Each piece of art we share is from days of Phish in the past, typically from the 1.0 and 2.0 eras, something of note that fans of all ages can appreciate that is featured in the book PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish, with some commentary on the piece by PhanArt Pete.

This shirt was made by John Street Graphics and designed by Ryan Donaghy for the Hampton shows in January 2003. The shirt was sold in Hampton and throughout Winter Tour 2003. The 3 word ‘I Survived Hiatus’ conveyed a grand message regarding the incredibly long absence of the band from 10/00 till 12/02. Those 26 months were a lifetime for most and unprescedented in the bands career up until that point. This shirt summed it all up nicely – Survived was hardly an understatement at the time. It was an unexpected warmup in preparing for the unexpected breakup of the band a year later in 2004.

This Week in PhanArt History – Gamehendge Elementary

New from PhanArt in 2011 is our weekly Friday Feature: This Week in PhanArt History. Each piece of art we share is from days of Phish in the past, typically from the 1.0 and 2.0 eras, something of note that fans of all ages can appreciate that is featured in the book PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish, with some commentary on the piece by PhanArt Pete.

Have you ever driven by a car with those ‘my student is an honor student at ……….’ and said ‘um, ok’. Well, this sticker was created in the mid-1990s to add a phan-friendly twist to it. The average person driving down the street would see it and either ignore it as a typical ‘honor roll’ sticker or think ‘hmmm, Gamehendge Elementary…’, but a Phish fan who saw it would get the joke and smile. The simplest of ideas executed this properly leads to a touch of joy for all.