Category Archives: media

The PhanArt Coloring Book

The PhanArt Coloring Book, Vol. 1, is a a collaboration between Jamie Huntsman (Artistic Director, Headcount) and Pete Mason (PhanArt), bringing together artists Andrew Abis, Bryan Boj, Eric Hanson, Jiggs, Ryan Kerrigan, Lizzy Layne, Drew Suto and Terry Werner to create an all ages coloring book of Phish-inspired drawings. The coloring book for all ages costs $5

All proceeds from the sale of The PhanArt Coloring Book  after Etsy/Paypal fees benefits The Mockingbird Foundation. Get your copy today!

Order a Donut Bikini and get a copy of the PhanArt Coloring Book with your order!

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Cover art
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Sample Pages

Jeffrey’s Jungle, a new Children’s Book by Reid Genauer

Reid Genauer, long known as the voice and guitar behind Strangefolk and Assembly of Dust recently published his first children’s book, Jeffery’s Jungle.

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The 24 page book for kids ages 4-9 was written by Genauer and illustrated by Alan Close and tells the story of a young boy who turns up the thermostat while his mother is off running errands and a jungle sprouts in the midst of his living room.

Reading through the book, the rhyming story builds in a Jumanji like way, compounding the jungle that grows through his house with each creature that appears while the temperature increases. The excitement and suspense of the book is perfect for reading to kids and allows their imaginations to take the story to another level.

The illustrations are vivid and perfectly visualize the story and convey the emotions expressed in the story. The art pops off the page, evoking AJ Masthay through his animals plants and Bob Montana’s ‘Archie’ through Jeffery.

A natural story teller through his music, Genauer channels Shel Silverstein, Jerry Garcia and Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter through the origins of Jeffrey’s Jungle:

“All of that said at a young age I found that creativity – for me specifically writing – is a place where sensitivity is rewarded. It’s an activity where you can unleash your senses and let them scream. I would not have had the words to describe it back then but after reading Shel Silverstien’s “Where The Sidewalk Ends” at about age 9, I was inspired to start writing. Even though most of Shel’s writing is funny, there is emotional presence within the playfulness that I found familiar and inspiring. So at the age of 9 I started writing Shel Silversteinian rhymes as a creative outlet and I’m still doing it.

“With Shel, Hunter and Garcia as role models I have spent most of my life trying to channel myself into my writing as a way to connect with the world with the intent of being emotionally present but stylistically relevant. For 20+ years I have focused publicly on expressing myself through song and I intend to continue. But my journey started with trying to imitate good ole Shel Silverstein.”

Pick up a copy of the book and share with a kid today!

Announcing PhanArt Shows for Summer 2016

PhanArt is proud to announce three PhanArt shows this summer, held in Chicago, San Francisco and Burlington.

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The first show will be held on June 25th brings PhanArt to Wrigleyville and The Cubby Bear for PhanArt in Harry’s Hood. Located right across the street from Wrigley Field, this show will be held on the second day of Phish’s two-night run at Wrigley.

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The first PhanArt show on the West Coast, a San PhranArt Show will be held at Mezzanine, a few blocks away from Bill Graham Arena. This show will be held on July 19th from 12-5pm.

Finally, PhanArt will head to Burlington on July 30th for a show at Metronome, above the famed Nectar’s. More details of this show will be announced in coming weeks.

Artists and vendors interested in taking part in any of these PhanArt shows can contact phanart@gmail.com for more information.

Interview Project Part 5: Pardon Me Doug’s Kevin Roper

The next Artist Interview Project installment features Kevin Roper, keyboardist for Pardon Me, DougThe first part of this post includes a student’s reflective summary. It is followed by the full interview text.

Learn more about the Artist Interview Project course assignment in Dr. Jenkins’ introduction to the series. You can follow the Philosophy School of Phish on Facebook, Twitter (@phishedu), and the course’s public website.

Find more information about Pardon Me, Doug on the band’s Facebook pageYou can also follow PMD on Twitter.

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I had the pleasure of interviewing Kevin Roper, a member of the Phish cover band “Pardon Me, Doug.” I asked him six questions of a philosophical nature based on the work we covered in our course. Kevin, who was beyond a good sport, answered each question at length, giving me great insight into his work and its place in course themes.

In my second question, I asked Kevin what he considered to be Pardon Me, Doug’s main objective. Kevin’s answer inspired connections to several topics in the course, particularly those based around aesthetics and the idea of the “sublime.” Kevin stated: “…personally, beauty is an objective of mine. I like to think of a personal experience when it comes to beauty in Phish. It was 1995 on the slopes of Sugarbush, VT on a beautiful, starry summer night. They were playing Slave and it felt completely transcendental. To me it was the epitome of beauty. I definitely strive to recreate that feeling in our music.” This reminded me of Kant’s “Analytic of the Sublime.” I inferred that where Kevin uses the word “transcendental,” Kant might use the word “sublime” to describe Kevin’s experience. However, according to Kant, the beautiful and sublime are mutually exclusive. This is something my classmates and I discussed at length in our weekly discussion: why can’t something be considered beautiful and sublime at the same time? Most of us agreed that based on our own experiences, that more often than not, the sublime is also beautiful (while the inverse is not true as often). Kevin’s description of his “transcendental” experience leads me to believe he would agree as well.

In my third question to Kevin, I asked him about the role of Pardon Me, Doug in the Phish community. Throughout the interview as a whole, Kevin spoke of the importance of the community in the music making experience. He states that: “we all know that we are just sharing in the groove…in the greater community that wouldn’t be possible without Phish and our mutual respect and admiration of Phish.” Kevin uses the word “groove” in a similar manner that Elizabeth Yeager uses the word “it” in her thesis, “Understanding ‘It’: Affective Authenticity, Space, and the Phish Scene.” To put it simply, “It” is the unique feeling of “oneness” that one gets from a musical community. Later in the interview, Kevin describes this feeling of oneness in an eerily similar manner, stating “I watched the boys on stage, watched the crowd, felt the energy and turned…and said…ok, now I remember. I get it.”

The fifth question I asked Kevin was what he valued about Phish’s music/art, and whether he thinks that others should agree with him. He says that the thing he values the most is Phish’s musical talent. He says: “I do get pissed when people say blanket statements like ‘Phish sucks!’…if you don’t like the music they play, that is fine and understandable…but I don’t see how ANYONE can deny the talent that they have.” I found this connected to Dennis Dutton’s TED talk, “Darwinian Theory of Beauty.” In his lecture, Dutton discusses the psychological reasons behind what we consider art. He is quick to specify that beauty is not simply in the eye of the beholder, but in the “culturally conditioned eye of the beholder,” meaning that what we learn to be beautiful within our environment is what we consider beautiful. This means that those Kevin describes as disliking Phish based on taste alone have grounds to do so. However, Dutton also states that we find beautiful is in “something done well.” By Dutton’s standards, Kevin has right to be upset.

Overall, Kevin offered some insightful words on the philosophy of Pardon Me, Doug as well the Phish community as a whole.

Interview Transcript

Do you aim to bring originality to your performances? If so, how do you do so?

This is always a quandary when it comes to being in a tribute band.  Do you try to sound exactly like the band you are paying homage too or are you just playing the songs in some fashion because you just like them in general?  I also play in a Grateful Dead band sometimes called A Band Beyond Description. Unlike a band like DSO, ABBD is up front that we are not trying to replicate the Dead, but rather cover the songs in a way that we want to express it.  Usually it is pretty close to the original version, but it leaves room for us to put our own flavor into it if we want.  However, with Pardon Me Doug, I’d say that our aim is to come as close as possible to the real thing.  We study the equipment, the effects and the styles of Phish for each song and then do our best to mimic it.  We generally listen to specific live versions to get our basic structure and then expand from there.  Whereas Phish jams can vary so much show to show or year-to-year, we definitely strive to pull from certain eras in our jams depending on the night or our mood.  For example, we might say we want to do a really funky late 90’s Mike’s Song jam or an extra fast AC/DC Bag.  Along with this though is the fact that we all hail from a lifetime of listening to tons of different music and playing in other bands previously, so we definitely add in our on interpretations…or sometimes the jams just take us to something we aren’t expecting…creating something totally original.  For example,sometimes I’ll use my synth and the jam turns into something closer to STS9 or Umphrey’s McGee than a typical Phish jam. While Page has been a major influence on my playing since I was in high school and first started listening to Phish, so many other people have filled my head with influences over the years..  Bruce Hornsby, Brent Mydland, Keith Godchaux, Jimmy Smith, Herbie Hancock, Dr. John and so on…so, I can’t help but throw in my own sort of blended, “hodge podge” style of playing, even while I’m trying to be “fake Page”.  I’ve been recognized by PMD fans in places and been called that.  Fake Page!  Instead of Page side Rage side…  It’s Rope side Dope side!  hehe!

What is your main objective as a Phish tribute band? Capturing beauty, having fun, or something else? (None of these options are mutually exclusive.)

Yes! The answer is definitely yes, as in all of the above.  Obviously we think Phish makes beautiful music, beautiful energy and beautiful community.  That is why we do it.  That is what steers us.  We see ourselves…in a VERY small way.. an extension of them… not in skill or anything close to what they have achieved… but just in the way that we provide a Phish outlet for our friends, phriends and phans in the area who want to celebrate Phish music when they can’t be seeing the real thing.  We are nothing more than fellow phans.  We just happen to be the ones on stage and are lucky enough to be playing the music in front of people who appreciate it.  I’ve always said that we aren’t popular.  Phish is popular.  We are just fortunate to be decent enough to do it justice so that people enjoy seeing us play!  The real Phish is the real reason we have a fan base!  We really do have a great fan base though that is made up of a long time friends and an ever increasing group of new friends that we’ve gotten to know and they keep coming to see us!  I guess that kind of answered the something else aspect of our main objective..  We do it not just for ourselves, but for everyone out there who gets off on what we are doing… which is really just us trying to channel what gets us off!  But personally, beauty is an objective of mine.  I like to think of a personal experience when it comes to beauty in Phish.  It was 1995 on the slopes of Sugarbush, VT on a beautiful, starry summer night.  They were playing Slave and it felt completely transcendental.  To me it was the epitome of beauty.  I definitely strive to recreate that feeling in our music.

Certainly fun is a big part of it.  Otherwise I wouldn’t do it.  Part of the reason this band was formed was that we were all great friends and like-minded souls.  I’ve been playing music with Cam, the drummer, for 17 years now.  Benny (Guitar) and I played in a band previously and Cheese (bass) and I have played in a couple different projects together as well.  When we put it all together, much like Phish, we were brothers.  The bond goes beyond the music.  I think that shows on stage.  If I didn’t like the guys or the band was a chore or a job, I couldn’t do it.  We have so much fun together, whether it is goofing off at practice, being stuck in a van together…or most importantly when we are digging deep into a jam or banging our way through a high-energy song.  Seeing the reaction of the crowd and feeling their energy only further validates the reason we are doing this.

This is where I have to be honest though.  I’ve had my ups and downs and ins and outs as a Phish fan.  When Benny approached me with the idea of starting a Phish tribute band.  My first reaction was no.  I wasn’t listening to all that much Phish at the time.  Definitely had not latched on to 3.0.  My initial thought was no way! I don’t want to be in a Phish band…but then I thought about it.  I’d been in original jam bands, including one that I led with my own material…and it was frustrating to try to get any attention with it…but knowing other tribute bands out there, like DSO again, I knew that this could be incredibly marketable!  No one in the area was doing it.  There is a built in fan base! I might be able to go somewhere with this!  Maybe not get rich, but maybe a step above where I had been. On top of that, I knew that it would challenge me musically.  I was kind of in a place of musical boredom.  This could be the thing that made me want to work at it again and get better… not to mention, I did still like a shitload of Phish and I couldn’t downplay that. Lastly, I couldn’t think of better company to be in a band with…and so I was in.

 What role do you think Pardon Me, Doug has in the Portland community? In the Phish community at large?

PMD helped fill a void in Portland.  Portland has an amazing music scene.  The talent per capita here is unbelievable..  However, jam bands were few and far between and didn’t seem to have a place amongst the growing number of millennials’ and hipsters.  We knew the heads were out there.  I’d still see them coming out to see Dead bands, but that number was dwindling and the crowds were getting older. The State Theatre seemed to bring hippies people out of the wood works, but even there, jam shows were getting less and EDM and Dub Step seemed to be taking over.  But, we knew our friends liked Phish and we knew others did.  Other than the occasional Phish band coming through from far away, like Strange Design, there was no outlet for a rabid Phish fan.  We filled that void and people seemed very appreciative.

We are well aware of many other Phish tribute bands around the country.  We’ve gotten to know some of them.  For the most part, there is little competition as we are all in it for the same reasons.  However, there is definitely a bit of an unspoken territorial understanding.  We don’t try to play their market and they don’t try to play ours.  But we all know that we are just sharing in the groove (pardon the reference) in the greater community that wouldn’t be possible without Phish and our mutual respect and admiration of Phish.  We are just adding to the community.  Some people may be jamming on an acoustic guitar in the lot at Watkins Glen.  We happen to be doing it on stage.

 How would you describe your emotional connection to Phish?

 That is an interesting question.  It isn’t easily answered, but I’ll try to give an abbreviated version.

Phish was the first band that I truly identified with. Not just in the music, but in the community as well.  I was 15 when I first heard Bouncin’ Around the Room.  It was on a mix tape that my girlfriend of the time gave to me.  It also had The Cure, The Pixies and The BeeGees. Pretty freakin’ random.  I thought it was nice, but it didn’t grab me or send me searching for more of this band, Phish.  I was still trying to figure out who I was.  I was living in my WASP-y, upper-middle class, white-bred community of Fairfield, CT.  I started figuring out that I had some different ideas of how I wanted to live or what I might believe in.  Enter some new friends, driver’s licenses, and pot.  People started identifying with different music and for some reason that seemed to define people.  In any case, some friends turned me onto some other Phish songs.  Blindly, I bought Rift.  As a somewhat dormant at the time musician/piano player, I wore that CD out!  I had a thing to identify with!  I was a Phish fan.  Not sure if “Phan” had been coined yet.  We’re talking 1993 here.  A bunch of friends were going to see Phish at the New Haven Coliseum on Dec. 29, 1993.  I figured I’d better go along.  I still knew very little other than Bouncin’, Rift and a couple things I had heard on a bootleg tape.  Yes tape.  Maxell XLII.  Had to be that or the traders would get pissy!  But I digress!  It was the first tour really where they were playing arenas instead of theaters or large clubs.  Needless to say, it was amazing and I was hooked!  I soon discovered The Dead as well…and at times, I’d say that I more strongly connected with the Dead and all that they created, but at the time and at my age, I identified with Phish more.  They were the new leaders and I was jumping on the train relatively early.  I did get to see Jerry twice before he died though, so I feel pretty lucky about that, even if I was a punk teenager seeing the Dead.  Ok, not sure where I’m going with this.  So I started seeing Phish whenever I could.  If they were anywhere close to the Northeast, I would be there.  Not sure how my parents let me drive several hours on a school night or take a train to MSG to go see a hippy show, but they seemed ok with it, so I did it.  Little did they know!  Ha!

Over the years, my interest would fade and increase at different times. The funk of the late 90’s grabbed me, but I was all over the place for a while and Phish was not a big priority for me.  The hiatus and then break up didn’t really faze me.  I figured they’d be back anyhow.  Regardless, through it all, I was a Phishy jam band music loving dirty hippy freak…or whatever label people want to put on it…as opposed to anything else. So in a nutshell my emotional connection to Phish is that they helped mold me as a person who belonged to a community of like minded people.

 What do you value from Phish’s music/art? Do you think others should agree?

The biggest thing I value is the musical talent.  I’m still in awe at certain things they do.  I will never be as good as them, but that doesn’t keep me from trying! I love the diversity in their music.  I don’t think there is a genre of music that has not shown it’s face somewhere in the annals of Phish.  I do get pissed when people say blanket statements like “Phish sucks!” I want to yell at them and ask if they have a fucking brain at all or if there is something wrong with their hearing!  Everybody has different tastes.  If you don’t like the music they play, that is fine and understandable if isn’t your thing…but I don’t see how ANYONE can deny the talent that they have individually and as an ensemble.  It’s undeniable in my opinion.  They don’t suck.  You just don’t like them!

The other thing I really value is that in a time when record companies were becoming more and more controlling and turning musicians into “product producers”, Phish was able to defy that trend and continue doing the things the way they wanted to.  Obviously they followed in the mold of the Dead, but they pretty much picked up the fading debris of Jerry and the Grateful Dead at the time and set a whole new precedent for live music, jam bands and festivals for the next 20 years and counting.

 Do you think having an emotional connection to music is required to be a good artist?

Yes and No.  I’ve played in all kinds of bands.  Funk, Folk, Country, Blues, Rock and “Jam Band” (which can mean a million things.  It pisses me off when media lumps Blues Traveler and Dave Mathews Band as the “other” jam bands in the scene). While I played in those bands, I didn’t always love the music or have an emotional connection. However, I was told I was good at it.  So, I’d say that was me being a good artist.  However, I inevitable left all of those other bands because ultimately I did not have that inner connection to it.  So I guess it might not necessarily be a requirement to have that pure connection to be a good artist, but if you want to love what you are doing and have sustained longevity in that particular thing, then I think an emotional connection as absolutely required!  I was going to stop there…but I can’t leave it without the disclaimer that having an emotional connection to the music doesn’t necessarily mean that you love every single thing you play.  There are Phish songs that I hate playing.  I simply don’t like every single song that Phish plays.  But, I know what it means to others.. in my band or in the audience.  It’s part of the bigger picture and that is what is more important.  There are songs I like that I’m sure others don’t like as well.  With as many songs that they play, it would be nearly impossible to love them all.  But that is part of what makes them so great!  Something for everyone!  I remember one time when I was feeling a bit poo poo on Phish.  I hadn’t been to a show in a little while.  But, as I stood there with Benny, and I forget what song it was, I took it all in.  I watched the boys on stage, watched the crowd, felt the energy and turned to him and said…ok, now I remember.  I get it.

Phish Symposium at City Winery with ‘A Live One’ Author Wally Holland

Blank Space has announced an interactive musical symposium celebrating author Wally Holland’s recent book “A Live One.” The event will take place at City Winery on Saturday January 9, 2016, in between Phish’s New Years run and Mayan Riveria shows.

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Musicologist Jake Cohen and journalist/ artist Mike Hamad will join Wally for a discussion and live mapping of the music from “A Live One.” The event will be webcast by Relix and Wyllys will perform a short DJ set.

There will be copies of “A Live One” available for purchase at the event with author signings at various times throughout the evening. Mike Hamad will have setlist map prints of “Tweezer > Prince Caspian” from Magna Ball available for purchase as well.

Tickets are available at City Winery.

Bearsville Theater In Woodstock to Hosts Holiday Poster Art Show

The historic Bearsville Theater in Woodstock, NY is hosting a holiday poster art show on Saturday, December 19, presented by NYSMusic and PhanArt. The poster art show will feature Woodstock based artists Mike DuBois and Erin Cadigan, who will both be selling their work, as well as PhanArt, which represents a collective of poster artists from around the country. Come and buy that holiday gift for the music lover in your family, or treat yourself!

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Mike DuBois will be on hand, and is one of the official poster artists for the Grateful Dead’s Fare Thee Well tour, as well as one of the official poster artists for the recent Dead & Company tour. Mike will be selling some of his highly sought after limited edition prints, and those prints will be announced on The Bearsville Theater Facebook page during the week leading up to the show.

Erin Cadigan is an illustrator whose clients include High Times Magazine, Central Park Summer Stage and Adidas. She spent decades selling her art as a vendor at Grateful Dead and Phish shows. Erin will be selling t-shirts from her THREE Erin Cadigan line, phanart posters and art prints including her just released DRINKING ALE print. Local folks might know her best as the owner and designer of The White Dove Rockotel.

The Poster Art show will run from 4-8pm, and The Bearsville Theater bar will be serving those over 21 during that time. From 9pm until midnight or beyond, Bearsville Theater will be hosting a Good Ol’ Grateful Dead dance party for those over 21, which will be illuminated by a psychedelic light show from Delilah Rain’s Ambient Experience.

The poster show is free and open to all ages (4-8pm) and the dance party is $5 and 21+ (9pm-12am)

Postcard Giveaway at Grateful Dead 50th Anniversary Concerts

Fans attending the Grateful Dead 50th Anniversary concerts can take home a set of four limited-edition Fare Thee Well postcards, distributed for free in the “Participation Row” area at Levi’s Stadium (Santa Clara, CA, June 27th & 28th) and Soldier Field (Chicago, July 3rd – 5th).

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art by Mike DuBois

To receive a postcard, fans just need to visit one of 17 non-profit organizations who have info tables on Participation Row, and take a designated “action.” Collectively, the actions are dubbed the “17 Ways Deadheads Can Change the World. ” They include things like writing letters to elected officials, posting photos to social media or signing up to be an organ donor.

For $1, HeadCount representatives will stamp and mail any postcard, creating a great way for fans to share the Fare Thee Well experience with friends who could not be there in person.

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art by Una Toibin

The postcards were designed by renowned artists Mike DuBois, Jeff Trohldahl and Una Toibin all of whom have worked with members of the Grateful Dead or their affiliates in the past. The collection also includes work by Jessica Muessen, whose beautifully decorated envelope sent in to order Fare Thee Well tickets by mail was seen by millions on the Internet.

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art by Jessica Muessen

Only 2,500 of each postcard will be available (10,000 total), so fans are encouraged to arrive early and visit Participation Row well before the music begins each night. If all the postcards are distributed, it means exactly 10,000 socially-conscious actions will have been taken.

The four postcards celebrate four different themes of Grateful Dead philanthropy – “Freedom,” “Compassion,” “Stewardship” and “Community.”

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art by Jeff Troldahl

Participation Row will be at all five Fare Thee Well concerts. In Santa Clara, you can visit the non-profits at the north end of the stadium near Intel Gate A as well as under the stairs to the 700 level. In Chicago, visit the South Courtyard near gates 0-6. In both cities there will also be a silent auction featuring the only items signed by the Grateful Dead and their guest performers during the concerts. More information can be found at Headcount.

Announcing Collaboration with Philosophy School of Phish

The Philosophy School of Phish is collaborating with PhanArt to offer a unique opportunity for students to actively engage with their philosopical investigations while learning about the Phish community. As part of their coursework, students will conduct interviews with PhanArt artists and write essays incorporating the artists’ interviews with themes from reading assignments and course discussions.

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The Philosophy School of Phish is committed to cultivating public resources for Phish fans who want to explore theories of art and music in the context of their favorite band. To this end, the blog posts will be made available online this summer.

An exciting lineup of artists have signed up to participate. Stayed tuned for details!

Philosophy School of Phish is the nickname for a special section of PHL 360: Philosophy and the Arts at Oregon State University. Using the band as a case study, the course focuses on themes about the nature and significance of art and music. This year’s class begins June 22 and runs for eight weeks. It is a distance education course offered online through Oregon State University Ecampus and enrollment is not limited to Oregon State students. Phish fans from all over the country could participate in the course.

Here is the Final Lineup of Artists for “In All Good Company”

PhanArt Presents has announced the final lineup of artists for “In All Good Company”, the largest ever exhibition of Grateful Dead art and artists celebrating 50 years of Grateful Dead inspired art and featuring an extensive range of artists who draw inspiration from the music of the Grateful Dead. POSTCARD FLYER 4 x 6 FRONT FINAL

The art exhibition will be held July 3, 4 and 5 from 12pm6pm daily at the historic Congress Plaza Hotel, 520 South Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL, located near Grant Park. This one of a kind art show, created and produced by Pete Mason, will be held during the final performances of the ‘core four’ of the Grateful Dead during ‘Fare Thee Well’ at Soldier Field.

The lineup of confirmed artists who will have art on display throughout the weekend include those who have been a part of the Grateful Dead art scene since the band’s beginnings as well as poster and pin artists who have risen to prominence in recent decades.

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Poster artists include John Warner, Phil Kutno, Richard Biffle, TRiPP, Good Thoughts Printing, Jeff Troldahl, Not Fade Away Artworks, Jim Pollock, Michael Boyer, Mark Serlo, The Art of Ryan Kerrigan, all of whom will have a variety of prints available from across the portfolio of the Grateful Dead’s history.

Pin makers on hand at “In All Good Company” include Kingpin Designs, Dr. Wookles, Pin Me Down, Andrew Bryant, Pinsanity Designs Zenster and Dave Bangert, each of which will feature their ever-popular pin series and designs, as well as other items made specifically for the Fare Thee Well shows.

Clothing makers Uncle John’s Outfitters, Erin Cadigan, Get Shit Done, Heady Teddy’s Outfitters, Grateful Girls Scarves, Eden’s Rose Foundation, Lot Life, S.A.W. Creations, Vintage Dead and The Shakedown Shop will have a variety of clothing styles and hats and accessories, perfect for fans of all ages.

Photography exhibits by Dead Images from Robbi Cohn and Scott Harris Photo highlight and connect eras of the Grateful Dead with prints for sale.

Tye-Dye artist Courtenay Pollock, who crafted the tye-dye backdrops used by the Grateful Dead during their career will have the original articles on sale. Rhoney Stanley will be on hand to meet fans and sell copies of her book “Owsley and Me: My LSD Family.”

Exhibitors with a variety of art include Mountain Family Glass, Sunshine Daydream Hippie Shop, Morning Dew Tye-Dyes, Easy Wind Family Creations, Amigos and Us, and Art by Acorn.

PhanArt is thrilled to be partnering with Summer Camp Music Festival to host a MAKE A DIFFERENCE Drive in support of a local Non-Profit Organization as well as The Mockingbird Foundation! Those that join us in supporting these organizations during each of our three days in Chicago will be entered into a daily raffle, with drawings for prizes including a printed canvas by ReverbSoul and other incredible art, Summer Camp 2016 tickets, and more TBA! Additionally, Sunshine Daydream Hippie Shop will give everyone that helps us MAKE A DIFFERENCE through the weekend an entry in their LIVE Raffle on Sunday, July 5 for a ticket to that night’s final ‘Fare Thee Well’ Grateful Dead show at Soldier Field. Be sure to RSVP to the Facebook event to get updates on how to participate.

Musical performances during the weekend feature Chicago bands Jack Straw and Under the Willow, as well as a daily playlist curated by Blank Space Media. Jack Straw brings forth a richly diverse array of music, mixing together songs by the likes of Phish, the Grateful Dead, Eric Clapton, the Allman Brothers, Old and in the Way, as well as original songs. Under the Willow blend socially conscious lyrics with intricate compositions to evoke a unique brand of songwriting that borrows from bluegrass and folk music. A Playlist Presented by Blank Space Arts will set the tone for each day while complimenting each day’s musical performance, providing an audio component to accompany the visual aspects of the art show.

In keeping with the great tradition and success of past art shows, In All Good Company will offer free entry to all patrons and tubes available for purchase. Special edition works only available at the show can be viewed on PhanArt.net and acquired exclusively at the PhanArt show.

“In All Good Company” is sponsored by John Warner Studios, NYS Music, Summer Camp Music Festival, The Body Sound Chair, Scents and Subtle Sounds, Cash or Trade and Band Shirt Archive.

PhanArt Presents: Formula 5, with SOLARiS and PhanArt at Garcia’s at The Capitol Theatre, May 16

On May 16, Garcia’s at The Capitol Theatre will host Formula 5, SOLARiS and a PhanArt show, from 6pm until 1am. This show features two rising bands from Upstate New York and an exhibition from artists AJ Masthay, Fred Sutter, Pinsanity Designs and The Shakedown Shop. Tickets are available now.

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Art by Jiggs

Also available at the PhanArt show will be a limited number of David Welker’s “Rutherford” the first in a series of prints from the upcoming The Phish Companion, 3rd Edition, with proceeds to benefit The Mockingbird Foundation. Tubes will be available for purchase at the show.

Copies of PhanArt: The Art of the Fans of Phish will be available for the first time since 2011, with a limited run of 50 books printed.

Garcia’s doors open for the PhanArt show at 6pm sharp with music starting at 830pm.  Admission to the show is $10 and includes performances by Formula 5 and SOLARiS. The PhanArt show will run from 6-10pm while music will go until 1am. Garcia’s bar will be open throughout the show.

Formula 5, hailing from Albany and Lake George, NY, have recently released their first live album Live Five, Vol. 1, with Summer Tour dates across New York and New England. SOLARiS, a high energy jamtronica trio from Ithaca, NY will start the night out. The two bands perform for the first time at Garcia’s, a venue known for discovering emerging talent alongside established acts performing at The Capitol Theatre.

Tickets are available at the door or in advance through Ticketfly. Doors open promptly at 6pm for exclusive art from all artists on hand.